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The Mission of Global Health

Four decades ago, man reached the moon and gazed back in trepidation at the earth. In that astonishing moment, we saw our small planet floating in the darkness of space, improbably lush with life. 

Amid the complexities and contradictions of human society, it's still easy to forget that we all belong to one human race. Vast disparities of wealth, opportunity and social justice divide us. The lives of an impoverished family in Isipingo or Rakai couldn’t seem more distant from those of a wealthy family in London or Los Angeles.

Matters of Life and Death

Nowhere are the disparities more shocking than when it comes to health. Chronic illnesses associated with infectious diseases that have been banished from the most fortunate nations continue to kill millions among the poorest people on the planet--illnesses that can easily be prevented with medications.

Infant mortality is a rare and tragic event in the developed world; in the developing world it remains an everyday occurrence. In some places, one in five children dies before the age of five. As life expectancy continues to rise among the richest countries, it has actually fallen among some of the poorest.

Enormous Challenges and Opportunities

Today there is a growing sense that this inequity cannot be allowed to continue. The wonders and promise of modern medicine must reach everyone, not just a privileged few.

The quest to give everyone on the planet a fair chance at a healthy life is enormously complex. It involves science, economics, politics, ethics, environmentalism, psychology, culture, education, activism, and much more. The work requires the cooperation of an astonishingly diverse group of people--from microbiologists and research scientists to statisticians and community activists, from epidemiologists tracking the footprints of a new disease to barefoot volunteers bringing medicines into remote rainforests. Public health is conducted at the highest levels of government and in the most remote rural communities, by some of the world’s wealthiest philanthropists and some of the poorest people on the planet.

The goal of BioMonde through its community healthcare strategies is to unify all of these efforts in the simple belief that each and every single human life is precious. All people should have access to the basic essentials of good health, whoever they are, wherever they were born. Those of us with the ability to provide life-saving  medications to the world’s least fortunate—and to conduct research and develop new medicines—can and should do much more.

 

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